The accessible city

The accessible city

Mobility challenges

We are increasingly traveling for work or leisure. The result is that the pressure on the existing infrastructure is increasing and accessibility is decreasing. All these movements result in more CO2 emissions. Partly for this reason, policy plans are increasingly paying attention to cyclists and pedestrians. The increase in the number of cyclists is a positive development for health and CO2 emissions, but it also presents new challenges. Last year, for the first time in years, there were more traffic accidents than the year before. It is striking that more and more cyclists are involved in crashes. The variety of vehicles, the traffic on cycle paths and the difference in speed means that we have to look differently at how we develop safe cycling infrastructure.

 

The term "control tower" is increasingly being used, whereby inner-city transport is managed and distributed even more proactively than is already the case. This also means that far-reaching measures are needed that make even more distinction in the type of transport and the purpose they have.

 

 


With the replacement and realization of work on the Dutch infrastructure, roads, tunnels and bridges will be overhauled in the coming years. Detours, traffic disruption and delays are therefore insurmountable. A major challenge for many road authorities and infrastructure parties. Up-to-date (digital) traffic information about blockages is essential in order to be able to properly inform users and possibly divert them. All in all, quite a puzzle to keep the Netherlands accessible.

 

Fortunately, several successful solutions have been developed for this in recent years. With their knowledge and experience, our Partners offer a variety of solutions that can be used for the above tasks.

 

What does  WeCity offer?

Mobility Solutions Catalog
Director of Mobility Hubs
Experienced partners

Related topics

Mobility Hub

Mobility Hub

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